News archive

Science in North Korea: How easing the nuclear stand-off might bolster research

2 May 2018

Richard Van Noorden

The isolated nation publishes fewer than 100 scholarly articles a year — but as political tensions thaw, researchers hope for greater collaboration.

Japanese government urges young scientists towards industry

23 March 2018

Smriti Mallapaty

With permanent academic jobs scarce, the government wants industry to utilize young talent. 

United States and South Korea the world’s biggest science novelty acts

21 February 2018

Dalmeet Singh Chawla

Tool that tallies engagement with new biomedical concepts seeks to reward novelty.

The secrets of Switzerland’s surprisingly high citations success

24 January 2018

Dalmeet Singh Chawla

Small countries have an outsized presence among the scientific elite.

In Japan, corporates make reluctant partners

20 December 2017

Ichiko Fuyuno

The Japanese government wants to lure more industry funding into universities, but companies need to be convinced they’ll get value.

The top academic and corporate partners in the Nature Index

8 December 2017

Mark Zastrow

Exploring complementary strengths is the key to success in industry–academia science partnerships.

Destination Daejeon

20 October 2017

Mark Zastrow

A focus on basic research is shifting scientific resources from Seoul to South Korea's central city.


Japan shakes up research funding system

1 August 2017

Tim Hornyak

An overhaul of Japan’s competitive grants programme could revive the country’s international science standing.

What price will Japanese science pay for austerity?

23 March 2017

Ichiko Fuyuno

Japan’s stagnated research output corresponds with a deteriorating situation for young researchers. 

China and South Korea flash the cash in R&D race

24 February 2017

Ivy Shih

G20 countries dominate global research spending and production, but the mix is changing.

How researchers discovered phytoplankton are warming the Arctic

23 May 2016

Mark Zastrow

In climate modelling, one of the biggest impacts has the smallest of beginnings.