Institute for Basic Science (IBS)
기초과학연구원

South Korea

IBS was established in 2011 aiming at advancing the frontiers of knowledge and fostering leading scientists of tomorrow by pursuing excellence in basic science research. Since then, IBS has been providing infrastructure for long-term, large-scale, and group research as well as supporting autonomous research activities of researchers, focusing on exploration of creative knowledge. In 2018, IBS had moved to its new building in Daejeon, South Korea. Watch the tour video of our headquarters and some of our research centers.

As a basic science research institute representing Korea, IBS is running 31 Centers in physics, chemistry, mathematics, life sciences, and interdisciplinary areas as of January 2021 and planning to increase the number to 50. IBS has announced 2021 call for applications for IBS Research Center Directors and Chief Investigators. Applications will be accepted until March 2, 2021. For more information, please visit www.ibs.re.kr/eng/sub04_02_04_01.do.

The institute’s main philosophy is to select a world renowned scientist as a Center’s director and create an environment where the director can concentrate on his/her own creative research. That is because IBS believes that creativity can be maximized when excellent researchers focus on conducting challenging research in an autonomous research environment.

IBS has been generating research outcomes that attract world-wide attention and was named one of Nature Index Rising Stars 2016. Despite a short history, the institute is standing shoulder to shoulder with international basic science research institutes. With the 2018 completion of its new headquarters designated as an urban science park, IBS will maximize merits of group and interdisciplinary research as well as bring IBS’ research capabilities together. It will more actively recruit young researchers at home and abroad with its expansion, heralding an even brighter future.

Since 2016, IBS has been operating Young Scientists Fellowship (YSF) under the slogan ‘Initiate your own research at IBS. In order to intensify its support to grow the next-generation leaders of scientific investigators, IBS has been launching a new research unit called Pioneer Research Centers (PRC), a subset of the existing IBS HQ Centers since early 2019. PRCs consist of up to five Chief Investigators (CIs) each. A CI leads their own research group to pioneer new fields and focus on challenging research in the basic sciences. CIs are required to have scientific excellence equivalent to that of a principle investigator at a globally renowned research institute or to have great potential to reach the aforementioned level in the near future. IBS will continue its efforts to become a research hub where young scientists can devote themselves to their science with full autonomy and independence.

The Institute for Basic Science (IBS) retains sole responsibility for content © 2021 Institute for Basic Science (IBS).

1 July 2020 - 30 June 2021

Region: Global
Subject/journal group: All

The table to the right includes counts of all research outputs for Institute for Basic Science (IBS) published between 1 July 2020 - 30 June 2021 which are tracked by the Nature Index.

Hover over the donut graph to view the FC output for each subject. Below, the same research outputs are grouped by subject. Click on the subject to drill-down into a list of articles organized by journal, and then by title.

Note: Articles may be assigned to more than one subject area.

Count Share
313 81.52

Outputs by subject (Share)

Subject Count Share
Chemistry 142 39.85
Physical Sciences 174 44.11
21 5.32
16 3.62
13 2.40
7 1.06
4 1.75
10 4.54
20 4.59
Enhancing Li Ion Battery Performance by Mechanical Resonance
2021-06-07
0.14
Vertical Nanowire Electrode Array for Enhanced Neurogenesis of Human Neural Stem Cells via Intracellular Electrical Stimulation
2021-05-17
0.05
Superconducting Sr2RuO4 Thin Films without Out-of-Phase Boundaries by Higher-Order Ruddlesden–Popper Intergrowth
2021-05-12
0.23
γ-GeSe: A New Hexagonal Polymorph from Group IV–VI Monochalcogenides
2021-05-10
0.17
Anisotropic Angstrom-Wide Conductive Channels in Black Phosphorus by Top-down Cu Intercalation
2021-05-05
0.36
Dramatic Reduction of Contact Resistance via Ultrathin LiF in Two-Dimensional MoS2 Field Effect Transistors
2021-04-15
0.10
Magnetothermally Activated Nanometer-level Modular Functional Group Grafting of Nanoparticles
2021-04-15
0.62
All-Tissue-like Multifunctional Optoelectronic Mesh for Deep-Brain Modulation and Mapping
2021-03-18
0.05
Escalated Photocurrent with Excitation Energy in Dual-Gated MoTe2
2021-02-16
0.43
Polarization Control of Deterministic Single-Photon Emitters in Monolayer WSe2
2021-01-27
0.03
Layered Aluminum for Electromagnetic Wave Absorber with Near-Zero Reflection
2021-01-13
0.20
Correlating 3D Surface Atomic Structure and Catalytic Activities of Pt Nanocrystals
2021-01-08
0.19
Surface-Textured Mixed-Metal-Oxide Nanocrystals as Efficient Catalysts for ROS Production and Biofilm Eradication
2020-12-11
0.12
Photoactive Antiviral Face Mask with Self-Sterilization and Reusability
2020-11-23
0.36
Ligand-Dependent Coalescence Behaviors of Gold Nanoparticles Studied by Multichamber Graphene Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy
2020-11-13
0.24
Switchable, Tunable, and Directable Exciton Funneling in Periodically Wrinkled WS2
2020-10-14
0.11
Phonon Angular Momentum Hall Effect
2020-09-21
0.33
Biphasic Electrical Pulse by a Micropillar Electrode Array Enhances Maturation and Drug Response of Reprogrammed Cardiac Spheroids
2020-09-02
0.07
Intense Dark Exciton Emission from Strongly Quantum-Confined CsPbBr3 Nanocrystals
2020-08-26
0.31
Pseudogap and Weak Multifractality in 2D Disordered Mott Charge-Density-Wave Insulator
2020-08-06
0.50
3 1
18 4.85
3 1.04
3 0.54
2 0.35
1 0.04
14 3.57
2 0.05
22 5.36
1 0.07
2 1.61
1 0.64
7 1.68
4 0.03
Life Sciences 51 12.07
Earth & Environmental Sciences 11 2.14

Highlight of the month

Fewer but fiercer tropical cyclones expected

© Warren Faidley/Corbis/Getty Images

© Warren Faidley/Corbis/Getty Images

Rising greenhouse gases could see tropical cyclones drop in number but rise in intensity.

Tropical cyclones are among the most deadly and destructive weather disasters. Predicting how they will respond to global warming is essential for limiting damage, but current climate models often underestimate critical interactions between the oceans and the atmosphere.

Now, a team led by researchers from the Institute for Basic Science has used an ultrahigh-resolution climate model to predict how tropical cyclones will respond to rising greenhouse gases.

Their model predicted that, while the number of cyclones would decrease globally, their intensity would increase.

According to the model, a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide would increase the average wind speed of cyclones that make landfall by 6%. In addition, storm rainfall would increase by 9.5% for every one degree rise in sea surface temperature.

These findings should inform climate adaptation efforts, particularly in coastal areas where flood risks are expected to rise.

Supported content

  1. Science Advances 6, eabd5109 (2020). doi: 10.1126/sciadv.abd5109

View the article on the Nature Index

See more research highlights from Institute for Basic Science (IBS)

More research highlights from Institute for Basic Science (IBS)

1 July 2020 - 30 June 2021

International vs. domestic collaboration by Share

  • 56.39% Domestic
  • 43.61% International

Note: Hover over the graph to view the percentage of collaboration.

Note: Collaboration is determined by the fractional count (Share), which is listed in parentheses.

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