Institute for Basic Science (IBS)
기초과학연구원

South Korea

IBS was established in 2011 aiming at advancing the frontiers of knowledge and fostering leading scientists of tomorrow by pursuing excellence in basic science research. Since then, IBS has been providing infrastructure for long-term, large-scale, and group research as well as supporting autonomous research activities of researchers, focusing on exploration of creative knowledge. In 2018, IBS had moved to its new building in Daejeon, South Korea. Watch the tour video of our headquarters and some of our research centers.

As a basic science research institute representing Korea, IBS is running 31 Centers in physics, chemistry, mathematics, life sciences, and interdisciplinary areas as of January 2021 and planning to increase the number to 50. IBS has announced 2021 call for applications for IBS Research Center Directors and Chief Investigators. Applications will be accepted until March 2, 2021. For more information, please visit www.ibs.re.kr/eng/sub04_02_04_01.do.

The institute’s main philosophy is to select a world renowned scientist as a Center’s director and create an environment where the director can concentrate on his/her own creative research. That is because IBS believes that creativity can be maximized when excellent researchers focus on conducting challenging research in an autonomous research environment.

IBS has been generating research outcomes that attract world-wide attention and was named one of Nature Index Rising Stars 2016. Despite a short history, the institute is standing shoulder to shoulder with international basic science research institutes. With the 2018 completion of its new headquarters designated as an urban science park, IBS will maximize merits of group and interdisciplinary research as well as bring IBS’ research capabilities together. It will more actively recruit young researchers at home and abroad with its expansion, heralding an even brighter future.

Since 2016, IBS has been operating Young Scientists Fellowship (YSF) under the slogan ‘Initiate your own research at IBS. In order to intensify its support to grow the next-generation leaders of scientific investigators, IBS has been launching a new research unit called Pioneer Research Centers (PRC), a subset of the existing IBS HQ Centers since early 2019. PRCs consist of up to five Chief Investigators (CIs) each. A CI leads their own research group to pioneer new fields and focus on challenging research in the basic sciences. CIs are required to have scientific excellence equivalent to that of a principle investigator at a globally renowned research institute or to have great potential to reach the aforementioned level in the near future. IBS will continue its efforts to become a research hub where young scientists can devote themselves to their science with full autonomy and independence.

The Institute for Basic Science (IBS) retains sole responsibility for content © 2021 Institute for Basic Science (IBS).

1 July 2020 - 30 June 2021

Region: Global
Subject/journal group: All

The table to the right includes counts of all research outputs for Institute for Basic Science (IBS) published between 1 July 2020 - 30 June 2021 which are tracked by the Nature Index.

Hover over the donut graph to view the FC output for each subject. Below, the same research outputs are grouped by subject. Click on the subject to drill-down into a list of articles organized by journal, and then by title.

Note: Articles may be assigned to more than one subject area.

Count Share
313 81.52

Outputs by subject (Share)

Subject Count Share
Chemistry 142 39.85
13 2.40
1 0.25
11 3.35
5 1.67
11 2.25
4 0.51
25 9.20
Enantioselective Access to Spirolactams via Nitrenoid Transfer Enabled by Enhanced Noncovalent Interactions
2021-04-22
0.50
Lipid-Oriented Live-Cell Distinction of B and T Lymphocytes
2021-04-09
0.15
Merging NiH Catalysis and Inner-Sphere Metal-Nitrenoid Transfer for Hydroamidation of Alkynes
2021-04-09
0.50
Cobalt-Catalyzed Intermolecular C–H Amidation of Unactivated Alkanes
2021-03-29
0.50
Designing Atomically Dispersed Au on Tensile-Strained Pd for Efficient CO2 Electroreduction to Formate
2021-03-16
0.36
Tuning Orbital Symmetry of Iridium Nitrenoid Enables Catalytic Diastereo- and Enantioselective Alkene Difunctionalizations
2021-03-05
0.50
Site-Selective Direct C–H Pyridylation of Unactivated Alkanes by Triplet Excited Anthraquinone
2021-02-08
0.50
On-Nanoparticle Gating Units Render an Ordinary Catalyst Substrate- and Site-Selective
2021-01-20
0.54
One-Pot Heterointerfacial Metamorphosis for Synthesis and Control of Widely Varying Heterostructured Nanoparticles
2021-01-13
0.17
Copper-Catalyzed Enantiotopic-Group-Selective Allylation of gem-Diborylalkanes
2021-01-04
0.21
Highly Fluorescent Gold Cluster Assembly
2020-12-21
0.43
Copper-Catalyzed Formal Dehydrogenative Coupling of Carbonyls with Polyfluoroarenes Leading to β-C–H Arylation
2020-11-25
0.50
NiH-Catalyzed Proximal-Selective Hydroamination of Unactivated Alkenes
2020-11-18
0.50
Merging Two Functions in a Single Rh Catalyst System: Bimodular Conjugate for Light-Induced Oxidative Coupling
2020-10-30
0.67
Wallpaper Dirac Fermion in a Nonsymmorphic Topological Kondo Insulator: PuB4
2020-10-28
0.13
Synthesis of a Copper 1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-benzenetriol Metal–Organic Framework
2020-10-06
0.30
Exceptionally High Average Power Factor and Thermoelectric Figure of Merit in n-type PbSe by the Dual Incorporation of Cu and Te
2020-08-18
0.05
Direct Synthesis of Intermetallic Platinum–Alloy Nanoparticles Highly Loaded on Carbon Supports for Efficient Electrocatalysis
2020-08-05
0.38
Designing a Planar Chiral Rhodium Indenyl Catalyst for Regio- and Enantioselective Allylic C–H Amidation
2020-07-30
0.19
[Cu32(PET)24H8Cl2](PPh4)2: A Copper Hydride Nanocluster with a Bisquare Antiprismatic Core
2020-07-16
0.25
Operando Identification of the Chemical and Structural Origin of Li-Ion Battery Aging at Near-Ambient Temperature
2020-07-15
0.44
C–H/C–C Functionalization Approach to N-Fused Heterocycles from Saturated Azacycles
2020-07-06
0.19
Revealing Kinetics of Two-Electron Oxygen Reduction Reaction at Single-Molecule Level
2020-07-06
0.25
cine-Silylative Ring-Opening of α-Methyl Azacycles Enabled by the Silylium-Induced C–N Bond Cleavage
2020-07-06
0.50
Visible-Light-Enabled Ortho-Selective Aminopyridylation of Alkenes with N-Aminopyridinium Ylides
2020-07-02
0.50
1 0.50
20 4.59
5 1.47
2 0.78
17 4.81
3 1.04
3 0.54
3 0.73
2 0.34
4 1
7 2.23
5 2.21
Physical Sciences 174 44.11
Life Sciences 51 12.07
Earth & Environmental Sciences 11 2.14

Highlight of the month

Fewer but fiercer tropical cyclones expected

© Warren Faidley/Corbis/Getty Images

© Warren Faidley/Corbis/Getty Images

Rising greenhouse gases could see tropical cyclones drop in number but rise in intensity.

Tropical cyclones are among the most deadly and destructive weather disasters. Predicting how they will respond to global warming is essential for limiting damage, but current climate models often underestimate critical interactions between the oceans and the atmosphere.

Now, a team led by researchers from the Institute for Basic Science has used an ultrahigh-resolution climate model to predict how tropical cyclones will respond to rising greenhouse gases.

Their model predicted that, while the number of cyclones would decrease globally, their intensity would increase.

According to the model, a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide would increase the average wind speed of cyclones that make landfall by 6%. In addition, storm rainfall would increase by 9.5% for every one degree rise in sea surface temperature.

These findings should inform climate adaptation efforts, particularly in coastal areas where flood risks are expected to rise.

Supported content

  1. Science Advances 6, eabd5109 (2020). doi: 10.1126/sciadv.abd5109

View the article on the Nature Index

See more research highlights from Institute for Basic Science (IBS)

More research highlights from Institute for Basic Science (IBS)

1 July 2020 - 30 June 2021

International vs. domestic collaboration by Share

  • 56.39% Domestic
  • 43.61% International

Note: Hover over the graph to view the percentage of collaboration.

Note: Collaboration is determined by the fractional count (Share), which is listed in parentheses.

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