Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU)
Санкт-Петербургский политехнический университет Петра Великого (СПбПУ)

Russia

Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, more habitually known in Russia and abroad as the St. Petersburg Polytechnic Institute, is a multidisciplinary research and education center. The university is situated in one of the most beautiful cities in the world – St. Petersburg, the second largest city in Russia, is rightfully called the cultural capital of Russia. A metropolitan city of five million people, it every year attracts nearly seven million tourists, of which about one half are foreign guests coming from all over the world.

Polytechnic University maintains and strengthens multicultural traditions established by Peter the Great, the historic emperor who directed Russia toward Enlightenment. More than 6000 overseas students are studying at our university and this number keeps growing every year.

Polytechnic University is integrated into the global academic community being a partner of many research and educational institutions and industrial companies. Research at the Polytechnic University is focused on the most important problems in science, engineering and technology:

  • Nuclear physics, condensed matter physics, plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion, radio physics and electronics, physical and chemical bases of the organization of biological systems, biophysics, bioinformatics, medical physics and engineering, physical chemistry, space exploration.
  • Physical and technical problems of power engineering, nature resource management, urban management systems.
  • Computer science, control systems and cybernetics, robotics, telecommunications systems.
  • Mechanics, construction materials, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies, physical and chemical basis of metallurgical processes.

For more than a century, the history and glory of the Polytechnic University was created by the people who had taught and studied here, including Nobel Prize winners P.L. Kapitsa, N.N. Semyonov, Z.I. Alferov, famous physicists A.F. Ioffe, I.V. Kurchatov, A.A. Radzig, Y.B. Khariton, Constuctor General O.A. Antonov, and many other talented and famous scientists.

Nowadays, Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University has a prominent role in the scientific and educational community of the country and the world, seeking to integrate science and research activity into the educational process. The 21st century is extremely demanding to the quality of technical universities. The conceptual basis for the development of educational institutions is multilevel integration in the scheme “education - science - production”, transition to technosphere complexes, combination of advanced technologies in education, research and production.

We are happy to invite those who are interested in good education and good research to come to our university and benefit not only from its highly professional faculty, up-to-date university equipment and other facilities, but also have the great chance to live in our unique city.

Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University retains sole responsibility for content © 2020 Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University.

1 June 2019 - 31 May 2020

Region: Global
Subject/journal group: All

The table to the right includes counts of all research outputs for Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) published between 1 June 2019 - 31 May 2020 which are tracked by the Nature Index.

Hover over the donut graph to view the FC output for each subject. Below, the same research outputs are grouped by subject. Click on the subject to drill-down into a list of articles organized by journal, and then by title.

Note: Articles may be assigned to more than one subject area.

Count Share
59 1.82

Outputs by subject (Share)

Subject Count Share
Physical Sciences 55 1.25
Chemistry 3 0.32
1 0.12
1 0.13
1 0.08
Life Sciences 2 0.33

Highlight of the month

Mineral spheres make alpine plants better light harvesters

© Laszlo Podor/Getty

© Laszlo Podor/Getty

The mechanism by which tiny mineral spheres on the edges of leaves of some alpine plants redirect sunlight, boosting the light-harvesting ability of the plants, has been determined for the first time.

The mineral calcium carbonate occurs in various forms in nature. In several alpine plants belonging to the genus Saxifraga, it forms spheres that are several hundreds of nanometres across. Scientists have speculated that these spheres deflect light onto the leaves, but concrete evidence for this had been lacking.

Now, by performing spectroscopic measurements and numerical calculations, a team that included researchers at Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University has revealed that the plants use an optical phenomenon known as the Kerker effect to channel more light to their leaves.

The researchers note that this strategy for enhancing light harvesting could be exploited in bioinspired photonic devices.

Supported content

  1. Nano Letters 19, 7062–7071 (2019) doi: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.9b02540

View the article on the Nature Index

See more research highlights from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU)

More research highlights from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU)

1 June 2019 - 31 May 2020

International vs. domestic collaboration by Share

  • 12.28% Domestic
  • 87.72% International

Note: Hover over the graph to view the percentage of collaboration.

Note: Collaboration is determined by the fractional count (Share), which is listed in parentheses.

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