Osaka University Japan

Overview

Osaka University was founded in 1931 as one of the seven imperial universities of Japan and it remains today one of Japan’s leading comprehensive universities. The University houses more than 23,000 students and more than 6,600 faculty and staff members. Osaka University was named Japan’s most innovative university and is included among the most innovative institutions in the world according to the Nature Index 2017 Innovation publication. The University’s ability to innovate stems from its broad disciplinary spectrum and strong industry-university collaboration, as well as its engagement with, and contributions to, society. This strength is coupled with a drive for innovation that extends throughout the scientific process, from fundamental research to the creation of applied technology. The University continues to explore new research fields, develop greater innovation from the fundamental research stages, and make even greater efforts to pioneer interdisciplinary research projects.

With the motto “Live Locally, Grow Globally,” Osaka University has adopted a vision of openness for 2021. To this end, we strive to make our education, research and community more open and ensure that our three campuses are places where outstanding students and researchers from around the world can gather, learn, discover, and collaborate. Since integrating with Osaka University of Foreign Studies in 2007, Osaka University has enhanced its capacity in the studies of language and culture, and we are enhancing degree programs conducted in English and Japanese language support for international students and faculty. In recent years, the University has also actively expanded its global outreach by setting up overseas centers in San Francisco, Groningen, Bangkok and Shanghai.

Osaka University leverages its role as a Designated National University Corporation selected by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology to contribute to innovation for human welfare, the sustainable development of society, and social transformation.

Osaka University retains sole responsibility for content © 2021 Osaka University.

Research

Date range: 1 October 2020 - 30 September 2021

Region: Global
Subject/journal group: All

The table to the right includes counts of all research outputs for Osaka University published between 1 October 2020 - 30 September 2021 which are tracked by the Nature Index.

Hover over the donut graph to view the Share for each subject. Below, the same research outputs are grouped by subject. Click on the subject to drill-down into a list of articles organized by journal, and then by title.

Note: Articles may be assigned to more than one subject area.

Article Count and Share for Osaka University
Count Share
508 187.68

Outputs by subject (Share)

Outputs by subject
Subject Count Share
168 52.50
184 40.18
202 107.44
8 1.26

Share output for the past 5 years

Share per year
2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
196.71 188.74 171.56 182.59 184.21

Compare Osaka University with other institutions

Highlight of the month

Pathways that prevent kidney damage

© SEBASTIAN KAULITZKI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty Images

The pathways that cells use to prevent kidney damage by defective lysosomes have been elucidated.

Organelles known as lysosomes are the recycling centres of cells, breaking down waste products into useful components that can be reused. But lysosomes pose a threat to cells if they rupture and spill their harmful contents. Cells employ several strategies for dealing with damaged lysosomes but much remains unknown about the pathways.

Now, a team led by researchers at Osaka University has discovered how these responses operate in the kidneys to prevent damage induced by crystals.

They discovered that a protein known as TFEB turns on genes that cause damaged lysosomes to self-destruct and that also induce the production of replacement lysosomes. The researchers also found that lipidation of a protein called LC3 was needed to activate TFEB.

The team confirmed this finding in a mouse model of crystal-induced kidney damage, with mice lacking TFEB exhibiting greater kidney damage.

Supported content

References

  1. Nature Cell Biology 22, 1252–1263 (2020). doi: 10.1038/s41556-020-00583-9

View the article on the Nature Index

See more research highlights from Osaka University

More research highlights from Osaka University

Collaboration

Date range: 1 October 2020 - 30 September 2021

International vs. domestic collaboration by Share

  • 58.51% Domestic
  • 41.49% International

Hover over the graph to view the percentage of collaboration.


Top 10 domestic collaborators with Osaka University by Share (291 total)

  1. Osaka University and The University of Tokyo (UTokyo) (48.66)
    Osaka University19.86
    The University of Tokyo (UTokyo)28.80
  2. Osaka University and Kyoto University (33.29)
    Osaka University15.96
    Kyoto University17.32
  3. Osaka University and RIKEN (26.58)
    Osaka University16.01
    RIKEN10.57
  4. Osaka University and Tohoku University (11.92)
    Osaka University5.44
    Tohoku University6.48
  5. Osaka University and National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (10.58)
    Osaka University7.17
    National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)3.41
  6. Osaka University and Nagoya University (10.45)
    Osaka University4.31
    Nagoya University6.15
  7. Osaka University and Kyushu University (9.17)
    Osaka University4.04
    Kyushu University5.13
  8. Osaka University and Hokkaido University (9.05)
    Osaka University3.70
    Hokkaido University5.35
  9. Osaka University and Center for Spintronics Research Network (CSRN) - Osaka University (8.67)
    Osaka University5.46
    Center for Spintronics Research Network (CSRN) - Osaka University3.21
  10. Osaka University and Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI) (8.24)
    Osaka University6.53
    Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI)1.71

Top 10 international collaborators with Osaka University by Share (1058 total)

  1. Osaka University and Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres (5.84)
    Osaka University2.88
    Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres2.95
  2. Osaka University and French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) (5.15)
    Osaka University3.03
    French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)2.11
  3. Osaka University and Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) (4.59)
    Osaka University2.08
    Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)2.51
  4. Osaka University and Max Planck Society (4.15)
    Osaka University1.00
    Max Planck Society3.15
  5. Osaka University and Harvard University (3.94)
    Osaka University1.02
    Harvard University2.92
  6. Osaka University and Hunan University (HNU) (3.72)
    Osaka University0.30
    Hunan University (HNU)3.41
  7. Osaka University and The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) (2.96)
    Osaka University1.86
    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)1.10
  8. Osaka University and Stanford University (2.96)
    Osaka University1.82
    Stanford University1.14
  9. Osaka University and University of Michigan (U-M) (2.83)
    Osaka University0.82
    University of Michigan (U-M)2.01
  10. Osaka University and Sichuan University (SCU) (2.68)
    Osaka University0.54
    Sichuan University (SCU)2.14

Relationships

Osaka University

Affiliated joint institutions and consortia