The University of Queensland (UQ)

Australia

For more than a century, The University of Queensland (UQ)’s exceptional study experiences, research excellence and collaborative partnerships have delivered knowledge leadership for a better world.

Across UQ’s three campuses, our 7,200 staff and 54,925 students – including almost 20,000 postgraduates and approximately 20,000 international students from 142 countries – teach, research and study.

With a strong focus on teaching excellence, UQ is Australia’s most awarded university for teaching* and attracts the majority of Queensland’s high achievers, as well as top interstate and overseas students.

UQ’s 280,000 graduates are an engaged network of global alumni who span more than 170 countries and include more than 15,400 PhDs.

UQ consistently ranks among the world’s top universities as measured by several key independent rankings, including the CWTS Leiden Ranking (31)**, Performance Ranking of Scientific Papers for World Universities (39), U.S. News Best Global Universities Rankings (42), QS World University Rankings (46), Academic Ranking of World Universities (54), and Times Higher Education World University Rankings (62).

With a 2019 operating revenue of AU$2.19 billion, including more than $452 million in research investment, UQ’s six faculties and eight globally recognised research institutes cover a remarkable breadth of teaching and research.

In recognition of our research quality, UQ was acknowledged in the 2018 Excellence in Research for Australia initiative for above-world-standard research in 93 specialised fields – more than any other Australian university.

Through UniQuest, UQ’s technology transfer and commercialisation company, UQ is also Australia’s leading university for commercialisation revenue, number of active startup companies and value of equity held in startup companies formed from university intellectual property. 

UQ is one of only three Australian members of the global Universitas 21, and one of only three Australian charter members of the prestigious edX consortium: the world’s leading not-for-profit consortium of massive open online courses (MOOCs).

* UQ has won more national teaching awards than any other Australian university.
** This ranking is measured by the Impact indicator P, P (top 10 per cent), and PP (top 10 per cent) with fractional counting.

UQ retains sole responsibility for content © 2020 The University of Queensland (UQ).

1 March 2020 - 28 February 2021

Region: Global
Subject/journal group: All

The table to the right includes counts of all research outputs for The University of Queensland (UQ) published between 1 March 2020 - 28 February 2021 which are tracked by the Nature Index.

Note: Articles may be assigned to more than one subject area.

Count Share
505 159.66

Highlight of the month

Regulatory elements stay on task

© Damocean/iStock/Getty Images

© Damocean/iStock/Getty Images

DNA regulatory elements that drive target gene expression are widely conserved across the animal kingdom, with functions shared even among species as distantly related as sponges and mice.

During development, short regulatory motifs known as enhancers help control when, where and how much a gene gets turned on.

Enhancers evolve quickly, though, and so their DNA sequences are rarely maintained from one animal to the next.

Despite that, a team led by University of Queensland scientists has now found that their roles in determining cell fate are often preserved across animal evolution.

The researchers inserted enhancer sequences from a marine sponge into transgenic zebrafish and mouse embryos. Despite 700 million years of independent evolution between the vertebrates and the sponge, the regulatory machineries of both the zebrafish and the mouse could correctly interpret the genetic information in a cell-specific manner.

Supported content

  1. Science 370, eaax8137 (2020). doi: 10.1126/science.aax8137

View the article on the Nature Index

See more research highlights from The University of Queensland (UQ)

More research highlights from The University of Queensland (UQ)

1 March 2020 - 28 February 2021

International vs. domestic collaboration by Share

  • 32.68% Domestic
  • 67.32% International

Note: Hover over the graph to view the percentage of collaboration.

Note: Collaboration is determined by the fractional count (Share), which is listed in parentheses.

Affiliated joint institutions and consortia

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