Technical University of Munich (TUM)
Technische Universität München (TUM)

Germany

Copyright: Astrid Eckert / TUM

The Technical University of Munich (TUM) is one of Europe’s leading research universities. Its unparalleled range of disciplines covers engineering and natural sciences, life sciences and medicine, management and social sciences – a combination found nowhere else in Germany.

Interdisciplinary solutions to future challenges

TUM draws on this unique breadth in fostering an interdisciplinary approach to research and teaching. TUM focuses on the following strategic areas for tomorrow’s society: energy & natural resources, environment & climate, health & nutrition, mobility & infrastructure, information & communication. At the same time, the university addresses the crucial societal aspects of new technologies.
www.tum.de

Excellence in research

TUM has an excellent track record in research, both in basic science and in application-oriented technologies. It is one of Germany's top-ranked universities and places among the top five technical universities in Europe. Consistently strong results in international university rankings, awards at the EU level, and statistics on third-party research funding all substantiate TUM’s success.
www.tum.de/rankings

Promoting talent diversity

TUM focuses on promoting the diversity of individual talents on all levels, from first-semester students to world-renowned scientists. Its outstanding course offering is strongly oriented toward research and, at the same time, tightly coupled to practical experience. TUM gives its students room to live out their passion for science: Students work on developments such as space elevators, robots, and gas turbines in autonomous research groups that carry on for generations.

In Europe, only Cambridge and Oxford surpass TUM when it comes to producing high-quality graduates – according to the 2015 “Global Employability University Ranking.” This outstanding performance is partly attributable to individual support measures including mentoring and career advice.
www.tum.de/studies

Awakening the entrepreneurial spirit

Ever since 1870, when Carl von Linde invented his refrigeration machine at TUM and founded the company that went on to become Linde AG, technology transfer has been one of TUM’s central aims. TUM cultivates intensive exchanges with a number of companies oriented toward common interests – through a wide variety of cooperation programs, targeted research projects, and jointly run laboratories.

Furthermore, the university inspires and empowers its students and researchers to think and act entrepreneurially. It also systematically supports patent applications and spin-offs. Since 1990, TUM has been the launch pad for over 800 companies.
www.tum.de/entrepreneurship

A global university

TUM is an international university with a high proportion of foreign students and researchers as well as more than 150 partner universities around the globe. With the founding of TUM Asia in 2012 in Singapore, it became the first German university to establish an overseas campus. TUM also has offices in Brussels, Cairo, Mumbai, Beijing, San Francisco, and São Paulo. By 2020, most of its Master’s programs will be conducted in English – today's international language of science.
www.tum.de/global

Driving the advance of science in Germany

TUM is an entrepreneurial university. Instead of relying solely on the German state, it takes responsibility for its own success, confronts international competition, and develops new ideas in the area of science management. TUM has been driving reforms in Germany's science system for the past 20 years. For instance, its tenure track system, unique in Germany, offers young professors who meet the highest performance standards a clear path to attractive career prospects.
www.tum.de/tenure-track

Recipient of top awards

TUM was awarded the title of “University of Excellence” in 2006 and 2012 in recognition of its innovative, dynamic culture. Far from resting on its laurels, though, TUM remains entreprenturial – constantly striving to reach new heights.
www.exzellenz.tum.de

Technical University of Munich (TUM) retains sole responsibility for content © 2016 Technical University of Munich (TUM).


TUM retains sole responsibility for content © 2014 Technische Universität München.

1 February 2016 - 31 January 2017

Region: Global
Subject/journal group: All

The table to the right includes counts of all research outputs for Technical University of Munich (TUM) published between 1 February 2016 - 31 January 2017 which are tracked by the Nature Index.

Hover over the donut graph to view the WFC output for each subject. Below, the same research outputs are grouped by subject. Click on the subject to drill-down into a list of articles organized by journal, and then by title.

Note: Articles may be assigned to more than one subject area.

AC FC WFC
551 128.30 117.36

Outputs by subject (WFC)

Subject AC FC WFC
Physical Sciences 311 68.54 57.60
Life Sciences 163 26.65 26.65
Earth & Environmental Sciences 14 3.12 3.12
Chemistry 110 47.83 47.83

Highlight of the month: Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Stardust found on ocean floor reveals a three-million-year-old cosmic cataclysm

 © Science Photo Library – MEHAU KULYK/Brand X Pictures/Getty

© Science Photo Library – MEHAU KULYK/Brand X Pictures/Getty

The discovery of remnants from a supernova, a massive, exploding star, point toward a cosmic event that may have influenced the evolution of life in the Earth’s oceans, according to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Scientists from the Technical University of Munich and colleagues in Austria and Germany, found traces of iron-60 in sediments taken from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Containing 34 neutrons and 26 protons, this radioactive isotope of iron is not produced on Earth, but from the aftermath of supernovae.

By counting the number of iron-60 atoms, they dated the supernova to around three million years ago, and estimated that the Earth took about 800,000 years to travel through its dust cloud.

The team has demonstrated that the supernova possibly contributed to a well-known mass extinction of marine life on Earth, as well as a period of global cooling and shrinking of the ozone layer.

  1. PNAS 113, 9232–9237 (2016) doi: 10.1073/pnas.1601040113

View the article on the Nature Index

1 February 2016 - 31 January 2017

International vs. domestic collaboration by WFC

  • 35.8% Domestic
  • 64.2% International

Note: Hover over the graph to view the percentage of collaboration.

Note: Collaboration is determined by the weighted fractional count (WFC), which is listed in parentheses.

Affiliated joint institutions and consortia

Return to institution outputs